54% of Americans want bipartisan cooperation in Congress

January 12, 2018

At a planning retreat at Camp David attended by Congressional leaders, White House aides and the POTUS last weekend, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made a plea for teamwork and harmony, stating, “We hope that 2018 [will] be a year of more bipartisan cooperation,” and predicting that a “significant number of Democrats” would be interested in supporting Trump’s agenda.

This burst of bipartisan sentiment certainly fits with the wishes of the American people, based on findings of a recent Gallup poll of 1,052 U.S. adults.

Indeed, 54% of Americans want political leaders in Washington to compromise to get things done, according to respondents nationwide.

The polling organization commented, “This far outpaces the 18% [of respondents] who would prefer that leaders stick to their beliefs even if little gets done, while the views of 28% fall somewhere in between. The gap between compromise and sticking to principles is the widest in Gallup’s trend [reporting to date].”

Those who want the parties to stick to their own guns are led by Republican conservatives, the polling organization said.

If bipartisan cooperation occurs— spurred on partly by the looming government shutdown deadline on January 19— it could begin to ameliorate, at least to a degree, the public’s sense that government itself is the top problem facing the nation today.

In addition, of course, it could help improve the low job approval ratings Americans give Congress (and Trump) and the negative top-of-mind reactions Americans have when they hear the words “federal government.”

Research contactdatainquiry@gallup.com

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