Posts made in July 2019

Mama’s boy or daddy’s girl? Half of adults admit they have a favorite parent

July 24, 2019

Maybe, in a perfect world, children would love both of their parents the same amount—but a new survey of 2,000 Brits conducted by ChannelMum and posted on Study Finds reveals that 50% of adults are either mama’s boys or daddy’s girls.

If you think for just a moment, you’ll identity celebrities who fit that mold: Bradley Cooper is the former; and Ivanka Trump, the latter, for sure.

Overall, the researchers discovered, 40% of respondents preferred their mothers, while one in seven preferred their fathers.

Interestingly enough, these allegiances seem to flip-flop as children age. Children initially are closer to their mothers, but 35% switch over to team dad by age 13. However, by the age of 20, one-third of them (35%) will switch back to preferring their mothers.

Many children appear to be proud of their closeness with a particular parent; with 21% of male respondents calling themselves a mama’s boy, and 22% of female respondents agreeing that they’re daddy’s girl.

“It’s often assumed that children are always closest to their mum, but this simply isn’t the case,” explains Siobhan Freegard, a parenting expert with ChannelMum, in a statement. “As fathers become more hands-on, there are plenty of children and adults who value the bond with dad just as much—and in some cases, even more than their relationship with their mum.”

Additionally, researchers found that different life events can influence parental preferences among children. Having a baby, for example, is more likely to bring people closer to their mothers than their fathers. Grown sons and daughters also turn to their mothers more often when they move, get their first job, or get married.

On the other hand, children are generally more likely to develop shared interests with their fathers as they enter adulthood. Children also feel closer to their fathers after being taught a new skill or craft by dad.

The survey also shed some light on sibling relationship dynamics. Almost one in five respondents admitted to being jealous of a sibling’s relationship with their parents. As far as jealousy among parents, 13% of parental respondents said they feel jealous when their children “pick” the other parent.

It’s common for parents to fear drifting apart from their children; more than four in 10 parental respondents admitted that losing touch with their children as they grow older is a major concern.

However, at the end of the day, the survey showed the most important factor in building a positive parent-child relationship is being there for each other no matter what (58%).

Other important relationship building factors included being able to talk about any topic (58%), spending quality time together (56%), establishing mutual respect (55%), and forgiving each other when mistakes are made (45%).

The survey was conducted by OnePoll.

Research contact: @StudyFinds

 

 

 

Airlines finally are fixing the middle seat

July 24, 2019

Airplanes are the place where personal space goes to die. We all know that. And the middle seat is a purgatory of jam-packed limbs and compressed body parts.

But what if the airlines were to completely rethink middle seats to make them more capacious and comfortable?

In 2017, Fast Company reported on a landmark airplane seat called the S1. Its design was unique in that it staggered the typical three-seat arrangement, so that middle-seat passengers were perched slightly behind others in their row.

The big news: Last month, U.S. airlines received approval from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install the S1 seating configuration on planes; an undisclosed U.S .airline will be putting them on 50 planes by the end of 2020, Fast Company says.

The S1 has been in development for five years, by the team behind at Lakewood, Colorado-based Molon Labe Seating. Designed for commuter flights of only a few hours max, the S1 moves the middle seat a few inches lower than, and back from, the aisle and window seat. It also widens the seat by about three inches.

This allows your arms, shoulders, thighs, and elbows to spread just a bit more than they otherwise could, without giving the seat more legroom or reducing a plane’s seating capacity (which translates to profit margins for airlines).

“We have discovered that what looks like a small stagger actually makes a huge difference. The trick is to actually sit in the seat. In fact our main sales tool is to ship seats to airlines so they can sit in them,” says Molon Labe founder Hank Scott.

“I have watched this several times—airline executives see the seat, nod their head and then say they get it. Then we ask them to actually sit down, next to a big fella like our head sales guy Thomas [6-foot-6, 250 pounds]. Within a few seconds they [really] get it—they stop being an airline executive and switch into passenger modes.”

The seat pairs this staggering effect with a two-level armrest design to eliminate the inevitable elbow fights that happen when six arms battle over four armrests. This approach works better in visuals than explained, but basically, the aisle and window passengers end up using the front ledge of the rest, and the middle passenger uses the rear portion.

Aside from the S1, the company is working on similarly staggered S2 and S3 models, which are built for long-haul flights and could be out in the coming years.

Research contact: @FastCompany

Revealed: Trump’s favorite new cable TV channel has ties with Russia

July 24, 2019

Recently, President Donald Trump has been so vexed by the coverage on Fox that he has taken to channel-surfing to find a more sympathetic news source. However, unbeknownst to Trump until this week, his latest version of Trump TV—One America News Network—features segments with a distinctly Russian accent.

Indeed, The Daily Beast reported, some of the stories that Trump has been retweeting from the station are the work of a correspondent who is actually a “double agent.” The reporter is also  a Russian national who remains on the payroll of—and continues to report for—the Kremlin’s official propaganda outlet, Sputnik.

Kristian Brunovich Rouz, originally from the Siberian city of Novosibirsk, has been living in San Diego, where OAN is based, since August 2017, and reporting on U.S. politics for the 24-hour news channel. For all of that time, he’s been simultaneously writing for Sputnik, a Kremlin-owned news wire that played a role in Russia’s 2016 election-interference operation, according to an assessment by the U.S. intelligence community.

Among some of Rouz’s recent reports are the following:

  • Iran Plots Terror Attacks in Europe
  • Far Left ‘Squad’ Faces Pushback for Accusing President Trump of ‘Racism’
  • China Pushes for Greater Influence at UN, Builds Political Blocks

“This completes the merger between Russian state-sponsored propaganda and American conservative media,” former FBI agent Clint Watts, a research fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, told the Daily Beast. “We used to think of it as ‘They just have the same views’ or ‘They use the same story leads.’ But now they have the same personnel.”

Indeed, the Daily Beast notes, OAN now pushes  some of the same false stories as Sputnik and RT, but with none of the legal entanglements.

Founded by 77-year-old circuit-board millionaire Robert Herring, Sr., OAN launched in 2013 as an answer to the chatty, opinionated content of mainstream cable-news channels—and a place for viewers too conservative for Fox News. Under Herring’s direction, the network embraced Trumpism enthusiastically, starting in 2016.

Over time, the network became increasingly dedicated to conspiracy theories and fake news, and became overtly supportive of Russia’s global agenda. When Rouz joined, the network had recently shed a number of anchors and other staffers who’d bristled at the change.

Today, althoughit’s available in only a handful of cable markets, OAN’s viewership includes some influential figures, including the president of the United States. According to Media Matters, Trump has fallen for at least two fake stories after seeing them on OAN.

Research contact: @thedailybeast

Paleo Diet linked to heart disease biomarker

July 23, 2019

If you are not living the life of a hunter-gatherer, you probably shouldn’t be eating that way, results of a study have found.

Indeed, more than twice the amount of a key biomarker linked closely to heart disease has been found in the blood of people who adhere to the Paleo Diet.

Researchers from Edith Cowan University in Perth, Australia have just completed the world’s first major study examining the impact of the Paleo Diet on gut bacteria.

The controversial Paleo (or “caveman”) Diet advocates eating meat, vegetables, nuts and limited fruit, therefore excluding grains, legumes, dairy, salt, refined sugar and processed oils.

ECU researchers compared 44 people who adhered to the diet with 47 who were following a traditional Australian diet.

They measured the amount of trimethylamine-n-oxide (TMAO) in the participants’ blood. High levels of TMAO, an organic compound produced in the gut, are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease—including heart attack, stroke, and death in patients who otherwise appear to be healthy, according to pioneering research conducted at the Cleveland Clinic in 2015. 

About 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That equates to one in every four deaths.

Lead researcher Dr. Angela Genoni from ECU’s School of Medical and Health Sciences said: “Those who promote the Paleo Diet often cite it as beneficial for your gut health, but this research suggests there were adverse differences in those who followed the dietary pattern.”

She said the reason TMAO was so elevated in people on the Paleo Diet appeared to be due to the higher intake of red meats, but also because of the lack of whole grain intake.

“The Paleo Diet excludes all grains and we know that whole grains are a fantastic source of resistant starch, and many other fermentable fibers [that] are vital to the health of your gut microbiome,” Dr Genoni said.

“Because TMAO is produced in the gut, a lack of whole grains might change the populations of bacteria enough to enable higher production of this compound.

“Additionally, the Paleo Diet includes greater servings per day of red meat, which provides the precursor compounds to produce TMAO.”

Dr. Genoni presented the findings of her research at the 2018 Nutrition Society of Australia Conference in Canberra last November.

Research contact: a.genoni@ecu.edu.au

Going south? Trump’s Miami resort in mix to host G7 summit

July 23, 2019

The Trump administration, which next year will host the leaders of the world’s seven most powerful industrialized economies for the G7 summit, is down to its final few choices after completing site surveys of possible locations —and Trump National Doral, the president’s 800-acre golf club in Miami, is among the finalists, Axios reported on July 22.

The G7 comprises the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and Canada—traditionally, this country’s closest allies; although President Trump has shown a preference for other nation states during his time in office.

Trump loves showing off and promoting his properties with no qualms about criticism for mixing state and personal business, and his interest in hosting the G7 at Doral was first mentioned by The Washington Post last month.

The Post also reported, on May 15, that the Doral was “in steep decline, according to [Trump Organization] documents,” with operating income down 69% since 2015.

The downturn at this Trump property “is especially significant,” the Post said, “because the resort had seemed better insulated from political backlash than other Trump properties, protected by its place in golf’s history, by its recent renovations, and by its location in a booming state that won Trump won in 2016.” It wasn’t.

Thus, the G7 would provide opportunities for extra conference bookings and worldwide publicity for the underperforming property.

This would be the first G7 summit since 2012 to be held in the United States. At that time, former President Barack Obama invited leaders to Camp David.

Research contact: @Axios

George Conway advises Dems on how to trigger Trump’s ‘final meltdown’

July 23, 2019

Attorney George Conway—a Washington, D.C.-based attorney who is married to White House spokesperson Kellyanne Conway, but doesn’t share her affection for the POTUS—thinks he knows how to trigger President Donald Trump’s “final meltdown,” according to a report by The Huffington Post.

He shared the strategy with his Twitter followers on July 16, in the hope that the eventual 2020 Democratic presidential nominee would adopt it to defeat Trump in the election.

Conway posted his idea in response to another tweeter, @HoarseWhisperer, who suggested that Democrats “”should be pushing Trump’s buttons every single day. Letting him build up a head of steam is a complete failure. He is an insanely insecure man. Prominent Dems should be poking at his insecurities every single day.”

Conway agreed, and said “the opposing nominee’s campaign should consult a team of psychologists and psychiatrists to figure out how to do precisely this. It shouldn’t be hard to trigger the final meltdown.”

He suggested that Trump had suffered from untreated dyslexia as a child, because “dyslexic children are often impulse-ridden and easily unsettled ….Emotional consequences …may involve lying, exaggerating, and feigning certainly about things they do not comprehend.”

Thus, he pointed out, Trump’s buttons might truly be easy to push, revealing his emotional instability to the American electorate.

While his wife remains beloved in the White House, George Conway, the HuffPost said, has been a persistent thorn in Trump’s side. George Conway continually has feuded with Trump online. Last month, he urged Republicans to take a new allegation of rape that advice columnist E. Jean Carroll leveled against the president seriously. Trump denies the accusation.

Research contact: @gtconway3d

Study: 55% of men are ashamed of their body hair

July 22, 2019

It’s masculine, it’s sexy … it’s embarrassing. While women may like a little chest hair, back hair, or facial hair on their partners’ bodies, over half of men admit to feeling flustered by their body hair, new research has found.

The fascinating statistic emerged in a survey of 2,000 men—conducted by OnePoll on behalf of BAKblade and posted by SWNS Digital— which found that 55% of all respondents said they felt ashamed of their body hair, with 20% saying they feel this way “often.”

Indeed, OnePoll found, many men are chagrined by their chest hair (40%) and back hair (35%). And this feeling of embarrassment may stop them from participating in certain activities. For example, nearly one-third of men surveyed (31%) said they’ve avoided swimming, while another one in four (27%) said they’ve avoided the gym.

Even worse, about 20% believe that their body hair has had a negative impact on their sex lives.

But, even with all of this humiliation, fully 44% of men aren’t doing anything about it, because they consider it “unmanly” for men to practice good grooming habits.

“When most men think of having better ‘grooming habits’ they often think of going into a salon and waiting for their name to be called for their waxing session. Who wants that? BAKblade strives to ‘keep it in the bathroom’ and allow men to manage the issues themselves,” said Matt Dryfhout, CEO and founder of BAKblade, in Chicago. “Our back and body shavers allow men to continue to feel ‘manly’ and keep their dignity while managing the problem in the privacy of their homes.”

The survey also found that men also aren’t too keen on shaving anything but their face, with 62% saying they’ve never shaved their back, and 53% saying they’ve never shaved their legs. Over half of men (56%) also agree that men should only shave their face.

However, the study found that men are definitely curious, as 43% of those surveyed said they’ve secretly used a partner’s grooming product, whether it’s a moisturizer, or a face wash.

 “While men, overall, are getting more curious in the area of grooming, it is the Millennials [who] are showing the most curiosity,” continued Dryfhout. “The biggest hurdle has been showing men options available to them while at the same time letting them know how easy it can be. ”

Research contact: @BaKbladeshaver

Neutrogena recalls Light Therapy Acne Masks, due to risk of eye injuries

July 22, 2019

Many consumers have “seen the light” when it comes to over-the counter acne LED-light therapy masks—and that’s not necessarily a good thing. In fact, earlier this month, Neutrogena issued a recall of its masks, according to The New York Times;  citing a “theoretical risk of eye injury” to a subset of users who have underlying eye conditions or are taking medicine that makes them sensitive to light.

The Times reported that Neutrogena said in a statement that its July 5 recall followed “reports of mild, transient visual adverse events, combined with a growing scientific discussion around the safety of blue light.”

A spokesperson told the news outlet that the “adverse events” had been caused by the Neutrogena masks; although she did not specify how many such events had taken place. She also said that no particular study or expert had informed the company’s decision to recall the masks.

But that is not the only brand that uses visible blue and red lights to treat facial acne. And it may not be the only mask that is causing problems—problems which the Australian Department of Health recently said could cause retinal damage or impair peripheral vision after repeated therapy with the lights.

Among the most popular among these devices are the Lacomri 7 Color LED Light Therapy Acne Mask, Convinsimo Light Therapy Acne Face Treatment, Neutrogena Light Therapy Acne Mask, and Pulsaderm Acne Clearing Mask.

They all use the same treatment technology, explains the American Academy of Dermatology.

And that also may mean that they might share another problem: Such devices kill facial bacteria that could turn into pimples; they are not effective against existing blackhead, whiteheads, acne cysts, or nodules, the academy explains.

Indeed, says the academy, “Most people see clearing, but not 100%”—and “results vary from person to person.”

News of the recalls in the United States and in Australia was for the most part missed by consumers . A spokesperson for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration told the Times that the agency was “aware of the recall” and was looking into it.

The mask was released by Neutrogena in October 2016. Actress Lena Dunham endorsed it on Instagram and said her post was not an advertisement. The product was awarded Best of Beauty in 2017 by Allure magazine..)

Dr. Rachel Nazarian, with Schweiger Dermatology Group in New York City, told the news outlet that only recently had concerns about blue light cropped up, and that they mostly referred to people who had baseline medical conditions that caused their retinas to be more sensitive to light.

But she said that Neutrogena’s mask did not offer enough eye protection. While she planned to continue to use LED treatments in her own practice, she said she used much stronger eyewear than was provided by the company.

“It shouldn’t be used in such a cavalier form,” Dr. Nazarian said. “If you’re using the right eyewear protection, you should be fine.”

Research contact: @nytimes

Jews take ‘Never Again Action’ at ICE migrant detention facilities nationwide

July 22, 2019

Serena Adlerstein didn’t expect her Facebook status to turn into a nationwide movement—but somehow her words managed to mobilize thousands of young Jews to the streets, protesting the treatment of migrants in U.S. detention, she told NBC News.

“I made an offhand Facebook post like, ‘What if young Jews occupied ICE detention centers and shut them down?’” Adlerstein, 25, she said in an interview with the network news outlet.

People responded, and by that evening, on June 24, she was on the phone with other young Jews from around the country planning a protest, and hundreds of people had signed up on a Google doc expressing interest in joining.

Their motivation was empathy for those seeking asylum and safety—but they also harbored memories and fears that stretched back more than a century: Indeed, as she watched pundits and politicians debate whether to call migrant detention centers “concentration camps”, Adlerstein was reminded of the Holocaust refrain she was raised on: “Never Again.”

“Never Again,” she thought, is now.

A week later, on Sunday, June 30, about 200 protesters under the banner of the newly formed Never Again Action protested outside a detention center in Elizabeth, New Jersey. As of that day, 36 activists were arrested and the demonstration had sparked a burgeoning movement.

My intent wasn’t to start an organization or a long-term movement,” Adlerstein explained to NBC News. But now that Never Again Action has spread across the country, she’s leaning into it.

Since that initial protest, just two weeks ago, Never Again Action has organized more than 10 different protests around the country, in states from California to Rhode Island, and more are scheduled in the coming weeks.

In Boston on July 2, more than 1,000 protesters gathered at the New England Holocaust Memorial, where they marched to a nearby jail where ICE houses detainees. In Philadelphia, 33 people were arrested when they blocked the city’s Fourth of July parade, holding sings like ‘Never Again Means Close the Camps.”

Julia Davidovitz, 25, a preschool teacher in Boston organizing with Never Again, told the network news outlet that people like her need to act and bring the community together because institutional leaders aren’t.

“This is an occasion where we have been moral leaders,” she said. “We have not seen as much moral leadership from the stronghold of the mainstream Jewish leadership.”

Her message: “Join us.”

Davidovitz wants to see entire congregations join upcoming actions, and invited her rabbi and mom to join her in action.

“This is a crisis no matter what language you use to describe it” Davidovitz said. “We are a community that’s been targeted. We can’t stand by while it happens to others.”

Research contact: @NeverAgainActn

Fat cats: America’s felines are no longer lean, mean purring machines

July 19, 2019

If the members of your family are overweight, there is more than  a “fat chance” that your cat is chubby, too.

A 2017 study conducted by the University of Washington-Seattle found that about 5% of all children worldwide and 12% of adults are obese. But what about the pets—specifically, the cats—that live in these households?

Now, a first-of-its-kind study—conducted by researchers at the University of Guelph’s Ontario Veterinary College— has found that, just as people in the United States and Canada have been overeating for years, they also have been over-feeding their feline pets.

In fact, the researchers say, the average weight of a spayed female cat went up 24% between 1995 and 2005, while the increase was around 19% for male cats, according to a report by Flipboard. 

Until recently, the problem had gone largely unnoticed because cats visit the vet less frequently than dogs and are less likely to be weighed. It is also harder to judge weight gain in a cat by eye.

“As humans we know we need to strive to maintain a healthy weight, but for cats there has not been a clear definition of what that is, we simply didn’t have the data,” said Theresa Bernardo, professor of Population Health at the college.

Her colleague, Dr Adam Campigotto, who led the research, added: “We do have concerns with obesity in middle age, because we know that can lead to diseases for cats, such as diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis and cancer.”

The team analyzed 45 million weight measurements on 19 million cats taken at vets across North America. The data showed that most cats steadily increase their weight up until the age of eight.

“Cats tend to be overlooked, because they hide their health problems and they don’t see a vet as often as dogs do, so one of our goals is to understand this so that we can see if there are interventions that can provide more years of healthy life to cats,” said Professor Bernardo.

The research team now plans to turn its attention to the development of automated feeders in a bid to cut down on cat obesity. They suggested the technology could be combined with built-in scales.

Dr. Campigotto warned cat owners to weigh their pets more often: “If your cat is gaining or losing weight, it may be an indicator of an underlying problem,” he said.

The new research is published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA).

Research contact: @OntVetCollege